Posts Tagged ‘sandstone’

Windows, Walls, and Loft Stairway

October 5, 2009
Kelley worked hard to select the windows for Bunny Vista, and he was excited to see the sunset reflected in them.

Kelley worked hard to select the windows for Bunny Vista, and he was excited to see the sunset reflected in them.

The crew has installed most of the Bunny Vista windows. They will wait until the drywall is in the timber frame room before they install the front windows and French doors in that room. I think the windows are beautiful, and when Kelley showed me how easy they are to remove for washing, I thought about my mother sitting on the window sill struggling to wash the double hung windows in the house I grew up in. I am so glad Kelley picked windows that are beautiful and energy efficient and ones that will be simple for him to keep clean.

The kitchen has casement windows. The one at the left was damaged on arrival, but the replacement is scheduled to arrive on Tuesday. The cypress siding is here for the shed addition, and

The kitchen has casement windows. The one at the left was damaged on arrival, but the replacement is scheduled to arrive on Tuesday. The cypress siding is here for the shed addition, and the crew will start installing it this week.

Lewis has almost finished chinking the log section.

Lewis chinks the office office.

Lewis is putting a layer of Permachink on the office wall. He put the first exterior layer of chinking on this wall early in the summer.

Kelley has finished building the staircase for the loft. It is beautiful. The treads are cypress and the stringers are white pine. He and Lewis worked hard to design a beautiful staircase that would not be so steep that it would be difficult to get to the loft.

If you stand between the kitchen and the mudroom and look through the timber frame, you see the loft staircase against the interior log wall of the office.

If you stand between the kitchen and the mudroom and look through the timber frame, you see the loft staircase against the interior log wall of the office.

The treads are protected with paper and tape, but you can see the beautiful cypress wood on the underneath edges. I love the staircase.

The treads are protected with paper and tape, but you can see the beautiful cypress wood on the underneath edges. I love the staircase.

The View from the loft

The view from the loft

Another view from the loft, including a look at the hearthstone.

Another view from the loft, including a look at the hearthstone.

Sandstone Fireplace Photos

September 8, 2009

The fireplaces are almost finished, and the crew has removed the inside scaffolding. The fireplaces are looking more beautiful all the time.

Here's the fireplace, sans hearthstone.

Here's the fireplace, sans hearthstone.

The top of the chimney goes behind the timber frame's cherry braces.

The top of the chimney goes behind the timber frame's cherry braces and a principal rafter.

Center section

Lewis and crew will put the hearthstone in place after the flooring is in.

Lewis and crew will put the hearthstone in place after the flooring is in.

The large stone will be the hearthstone.

The large stone will be the hearthstone.

Lewis has laid out these stones for the chimney top. He will finish the chimney with limestone.

Lewis has readied these stones and laid them out for the chimney top.

Building the Fireplaces

September 2, 2009
This fireplace will be on the screened porch

This fireplace will be on the screened porch

For the past few weeks, Lewis Wright and the crew have been building the stone fireplaces. The fireplaces, which share a chimney, are back-t0-back on the south side of the house. One fireplace will be in the timber frame room, and the other will be on the screened porch. Lewis is using sandstone from an old barn in Middlebrook, which he also used for the foundation of the screened porch.  There is also some limestone in the outdoor fireplace.

The large stones framing the sides of the fireplace center section came from Goshen. You can also see a large stone running horizontally near the top of the section Lewis has completed. This stone also came from Goshen.

The large stones framing the sides of the fireplace center section came from Goshen. You can also see a large stone running horizontally near the top of the section Lewis has completed. This stone also came from Goshen.

This stone is a fantastic color, which is extraordinary with the cherry and cypress of the timber frame. I love the curved lintel.

This stone is a fantastic color, which is extraordinary with the cherry and cypress of the timber frame. I love the curved lintel. And, of course, the stonework is intricate and fascinating.

Lewis and Braxton sawed an opening in the roof for the chimney, which will extend several feet above the peak. Here, Lewis is cutting and shaping the stone.

Lewis and Braxton sawed an opening in the roof for the chimney, which will extend several feet above the peak. Here, Lewis is cutting and shaping the stone. Braxton is posing, and Kenny, who is filling in for Aaron, is sending up mortar and supplies. The large, lighter stones are limestone.

This section is right above where the mantel will be.

Kelley and Lewis are planning to build a wooden mantel, which will be at the base of the section outlined on the sides and top by the large stones.

The fireplace is very beautiful. The stonework is amazing, and the colors, design, and proportions of the work are perfect with the timber frame. The chimney and fireplace will also be wonderful to look at from outside the house, so harmonious with the foundation of the screened porch. I am trying hard to avoid the over-use of superlatives.

Stone, part 2: Sandstone

May 28, 2009

We had not originally planned to use sandstone in the new house, but this spring when Kelley was looking for some logs to supplement the barn logs we already had, he found yet another old barn. The lumber from the barn, located on a farm in Middlebrook, had been claimed and removed, but Kelley and Lewis and Lewis’s assistant, Braxton Wood, were able to buy the foundation, which was made of blocks of sandstone and limestone.

Kelley says that it is unusual to find sandstone in Augusta County, but there does seem to be some in Middlebrook. We have seen a retaining wall of sandstone in the village of Middlebrook. It has very unusual striation and coloring and reminds everyone who looks at it of the Grand Canyon. Kelley said that although it worked easily, it was very hard and dulled the tools quickly. He noticed, too, that some corners of the old barn foundation were worn and rounded, apparently where cattle rubbed against them for many years as they entered the barn.

The barn foundation stones were sandstone and limestone.

The barn foundation stones were sandstone and limestone cut into blocks. The blocks averaged about 100 pounds in weight.

Kelley and Lewis hired Shelby Clements to move the stone to our property. Shelby loaded the stone into his dump truck with a trackhoe. Moving the stone to our property took one day.

Kelley says Shelby Clements can pick up a toothpick with this trackhoe and not disturb anything underneath it. He made short work of 110 tons of stone.

Kelley says Shelby Clements can pick up a toothpick with this trackhoe and not disturb anything underneath it. He made short work of 110 tons of stone.

When the sandstone arrived at our place, Kelley and Lewis were amazed to find how easy it was to work. They were able to split the large stones easily using just a hammer and a chisel. Kelley very promptly decided that he would like to face the concrete foundation walls for the screen porch with sandstone. Everyone worked at splitting and shaping the stone to prepare it.

Kelley and Braxton split and shaped stone for Lewis to lay.

Kelley and Braxton split and shaped stone for Lewis to lay.

Erin, nattily attired in handmade Swedish scarf and slouchy hat, lends a hand and splits some stone.

Erin, nattily attired in handmade Swedish scarf and slouchy hat, lends a hand and works some stone.

Lewis Wright did incredibly beautiful work on these walls. It is so satisfying to look at the patterns these stones make, to see how perfectly square the corner is, and to watch the interplay of large and small stones. This wall is something Kelley and I will enjoy for the rest of our lives. And never has a lawn mower been stored in a more handsome storage room. The mower that has the good fortune to stay in that storage room should “run perfect” forever.

Lewis Wright lays the sandstone foundation for the screen porch. The stone is so tightly laid it almost looks dry laid.

Lewis Wright lays the sandstone foundation for the screen porch. The stone is so tightly laid it almost looks dry laid.

Nearly complete sandstone wall

Nearly complete sandstone wall

The posts and lintel are heavy oak timbers. The door is nice and wide--easy access for the mower. The screen porch will sit on this foundation.

The posts and lintel are heavy oak timbers. The door is nice and wide--easy access for the mower. The screen porch will sit on this foundation.

There are still quite a few tons of sandstone left. We plan to use it for the fireplaces in the timber frame room and on the screen porch.